foursquare

A Mayoral Mutiny: Foursquare’s Diabolical Distraction

Location apps are looking for you. And me…and us. Restaurants are employing them to reward patrons. Tourists are connecting with local mavens for parking tips. Coworkers are battling for badges. There’s no more hiding.

It’s been two weeks since I’ve rekindled my relationship with Foursquare (after a two-year hiatus). Never have I encountered a more coy application. Foursquare gently nudges the user to let the neighbors know that you’re home. It invites one to leave tips about jogging in city parks. She (yes, she) even whispers alluring “Welcome back” greetings and flattering accolades.

How is Foursquare so sly? Because it’s barely been 14 days, and I’m consumed with the possibility of a claiming a mayorship. Mayor of my own neighborhood?! That doesn’t even take creativity, but I crave it nonetheless. A mutiny is brewing for John D.’s coveted title. (I shan’t friend him for risk of exposure.)

Tips? I’ve been generous – more so than the supposed mayor – in assisting fellow Central Gardenites with their safety needs and scenic running routes. Even photos have been included to increase likes and click rates.

I bet he receives Foursquare’s “passive” recommendations that were enabled last fall. It prompts users with tips about a particular area or business without having to officially check in, according to WIRED. No fingers needed. Very clever, Mr. Mayor.

Foursquare has also probably been granting him access to the area’s most renowned residents. If one is curious about a particular place, the investigator can simply review the venue’s list of frequent visitors. Excellent for questioning, err, I mean interviewing the superusers (Never fear, I’m onto his antics via Mashable‘s guidance.)

So, how does one gain a competitive edge? By diversifying! I’ve employed the help of Jelly, which now allows users to ask nearby experts for counsel. The sporty geo-location feature could breathe new life into this app that was once left for dead by John Biggs, an editor of TechCrunch.

However, not one native has responded to my inquiry about holiday garbage pick-up. I just don’t think my fellow residents are ready for that Jelly. Ergo, Foursquare remains the preferred local choice.

Mayor John, forget Game of Thrones, this is the evermore dastardly “Game of Mayors,” and you shall be usurped.

Mayor Memphis Maverick

(Future) Mayor Memphis Maverick

 

Supersocialgeoconnectedocious

Take that, Mary Poppins!

Social media has found its niche by being able to create bonds over pretty much…anything. (Hence, the super duper headline above.) Mundane tasks such as making lists have been re-envisioned as communal activities. Pinterest has attracted brides-to-be and established a daydream-like forum to ogle mason jar glasses and barnyard backdrops. Even Steve Buttry has found that pros use it to spice up the newsroom.

What’s more fascinating is how social media has fervently sorted and introduced people like Yente the matchmaker. LinkedIn visually maps how people know or could know one another through three degrees of separation. (If they upped it to six, I could finally meet Kevin Bacon!)

In Here Comes EverybodyClay Shirky describes how many applications and sites are social tools. People naturally congregate with one another, and our favorite people-finding apps facilitate this action. The geo-tracking features within apps and mobile devices have supercharged real-life connections. By checking in on Foursquare, one can more confidently search for the 5-foot roommate who’s hidden in a mosh pit. And these features are getting more precise.

The new neighbors on the block are Bluetooth-style transmitters and beacons that more accurately track one’s physical location by applying it to the surrounding environment or venue. The NFL has tested this by sending alerts to stadium attendees so they can fast-pass their way to shorter hot dog queues. And that’s just a sliver of the capabilities being developed.

Well, isn’t that special?

But what if companies, the NSA, or (even worse) helicopter moms start tracking us like blood hounds? For all the convenience that social media has granted us, privacy issues may dominate the next century.

Orwellian? Definitely. But as a super-social Leo, I can dig it.

SNL's "The Church Lady"

SNL’s “The Church Lady”