Month: May 2014

Guest Post: “Week of Trivia” by Elle Perry

I had never done a trivia night, but always wanted to.

Traditional wisdom says that restaurants and bars do trivia nights during the week when traffic is slower. The trivia, with promises of cash, gift certificates, and fun bring in people who may be more reticent to go out when they have to work the next morning.

I thought it would be fun to do an entire week of trivia. More accurately, Monday through Friday. I tried to pick a mix of restaurants and bars around town. All where ones I had been to before. In the future, there’s other trivia nights not included here that I would like to try including Blind Bear Speakeasy (because it’s a speakeasy! nuff said) and Flying Saucer.


On the first night (Monday) we went to the infamous adult trivia held by Slider Inn. Slider Inn, located at the corner of Peabody and Cooper, is one of my favorite restaurants/bars. However, I had only previously visited at lunch time (the have great specials and the wait staff are supremely friendly). Oh yeah, the have an awesome patio, that is zipped up when it’s cold outside.

Anyhow, I heard about the trivia from a former fellow graduate student who managed to stumble in with her dad one night they were doing trivia.

Our total group was made up of eight fearless citizens. We picked a great, evening-appropriate team name, which I will not mention here. Of the 11 teams that took part in trivia, there were several that cause the whole crowd to laugh uproariously when called out.

The questions were tough! There were several questions that came from recent news stories. The format is three rounds followed by half time then another three rounds. During half-time we were pleasantly surprised by getting small shots of an orange vodka poured in our mouths.

Though we fought valiantly (and bet the whole farm on the bonus question), we ultimately did not prevail.

Fortunately, though good times were to be had by all trivia participants. I will definitely be back and I suspect the same of my fellow trivia mates.

And I will never look at pop rocks in the store again without secretly cringing.


On Tuesday night we ventured out to The Cove on Broad Avenue. The Cove is an awesome pirate/oyster bar. They’re known for great made-from-scratch cocktails.

Out of all of the trivia nights that I found locally, The Cove has the latest time. Especially given that it takes place on a Tuesday night.

When I put the together the schedule, trivia was listed at 9. However it actually started at 9:30. Given experiences with Slider Inn and The Cove, it appears that the bars wait until as many people are in place as possible before starting. So the time trivia gets started seems to be fluid within about 30 minutes or so.

As it turned out, the trivia guy was the same as Monday night’s trivia at Slider Inn. I started off alone answering questions, because teammates had not yet arrived. I actually answered all of my solo questions correctly.

About four additional folks showed up. I do think that the late time was a deterrent.

Unlike Slider Inn, there were about six or seven teams competing. We were in first place after the first run, but ended up falling the fourth after the second. We wagered all of the possible points of the bonus question (which revolved around ranking the order of creation of toys from the 1980s). We ended up answering the question correctly and winning the whole game!

They actually played part of Bandz A Make Her Dance in honor of our team name (selected by me)

We ended up closing our tab too quickly however because the grand prize was $35 on our tab. So one of our team members got some pineapples soaked in tequila while the rest of us scarfed down deluxe shots of some sort of cinnamon flavored whiskey (not Fireball). I am pretty sure I teared up immediately after.

Due to the lateness in the evening, I ended up using Lyft service for the first time. It was great, except that the driver had not yet received her pink mustache for her truck, which is part of the appeal, to be honest.


On Wednesday we ventured to Tamp & Tap downtown. Tamp & Tap is a super cute coffee and brew (read: beer) restaurant. They also have soup and sandwiches. (And brunch!) Their trivia is hosted by MemphiSports’ Kevin Cerrito. There is an 8-person limit for teams, and the trivia changes themes every week.

That night the theme was Disney. I’m not a huge Disney person, but the questions were broad enough that generally someone on our team had an idea. In case you’re wondering there were about 6 or 7 teams.

We ended up in a tie for best team name (Books A Make Belle Dance), which had to be resolved via Mario Kart. One of our valiant teammates won, which gave us a free pitcher. We ended up saving that for a future trip.

At the end of trivia we ended up in a tie again. This time for second place. So more Mario Kart. Same teammate won again, which earned a $25 gift certificate to local t-shirt shop Sache. We gave him the shirt since he put in so much effort.

Upcoming trivia weeks at Tamp & Tap are Memphis trivia, logo trivia (sounds intriguing), and Friends.

I know my friends are particularly interested in the last one. 🙂

And they will have their trivia tournament in June.


On Thursday we went to Cooper-Young favorite Young Avenue Deli. (Known as “the Deli” by frequent patrons.)

The place was packed. Not sure if it was due to trivia or because it was Thursday. There were about 15 teams though.

Like the first two nights, there is no limit on team members. However, there is a limit on space at any given time. Deli trivia is part of Memphis Trivia League so things seemed more formal, with printed out slips of paper to keep notes on. The top five teams also went on to future rounds (carrying their points with them).

Out of all of the nights so far, these seemed to be the most difficult questions. The questions ran the gamut.

To do well here, a group would need to have a team with a lot of different expertise.


On Friday, me and a handful of friends headed to Ubees, which is located on the Highland Strip.

But alas, the trivia person had a tent down at Memphis in May Barbecue Fest and there wasn’t a backup person. To say the least, I was disappointed.

It was also two hours before their infamous Power Hour (insanely cheap drink specials, I’m talking 3-for-1 type deals).

The only other night I knew about was T.J. Mulligans, but no one was willing to drive to Quince or Cordova to take part.

And that was my week of trivia. It was a ton of fun, and honestly got a little bit tiring towards the end.

I definitely will be doing trivia again. Just not for a week straight. See you around town!

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Thanks to Elle Perry for initiating and enduring the “Week of Trivia.” Drinks were won, egos were shattered, and new friends were made. By day, Elle coordinates the Teen Appeal; every other second, she’s a Memphis super-connector. 

Join Elle during her Week of Trivia!

Did you grow up dying to fill that Trivial Pursuit pie? Ever stop into a bar unsuspectingly and end up winning a free round because you could recall Prince Mongo’s real name?

Well this week you’re invited to play every weeknight with Elle Perry, our local trivia glutton. Elle has selected five different hot spots known for hosting pub-style trivia around Memphis.

See the schedule below and show up to one or all: May 12 – 16. We’ll be live tweeting our adventures so follow along via #WeekofTrivia. And make sure to check back to memphismaverick.com for Elle’s recap and guest posts.

Elle Perry is taking Memphis trivia by storm THIS week! Up to the challenge? Join the fun!

Elle Perry is taking trivia by storm THIS WEEK! Join her for the challenge.

Take 5: Adam J. Maldonado

Meet an actor turned street poet who’s fascination with people’s stories has secured him a place in the hearts of mothers, scorned lovers, and many others.

Adam the Poet

Adam flawlessly strikes another’s inspiration into his Underwood Champion typewriter.

Stage name: The Poet Adam

Starring roles: Poet Laureate of the People; numerous Mid-South stage productions including Jerre Dye‘s debut of Cicada.

Daily script: Adam takes cues from philosophy, literature, and life as he welcomes each client with, “What’s your story?” He can bee seen around town at events like Tennessee Brewery Untapped,  Broad Ave artsy happenings, and poetry slams. Folks typically approach and hire him on-the-spot for “personalized poetry.”

Behind-the-Scenes: “All the writing done for events is stream of consciousness.” His hands glide across an antique portable typewriter to capture one’s thoughts and feelings onto a crisp page.

Yet, don’t mistake his talent for dictation or caricaturization.  Adam’s empathy guides him toward creating three-minute masterpieces.

How? “The shortest distance between two people is poetry. What separates people is the lack of speaking what is honestly on their heart.” According to Adam, there’s far too much sarcasm and cynicism that hinders relationships. Thus, he bridges sincere communication.

Cool typewriter but what about the web? “For millennials, the power lies within social media. We can have an immediate impact on the culture around us.”

His dream? “For poetry to be pervasive throughout our culture. Turn it into an industry. Something where you can make money, work hard for, and it benefits people.”

e.g., Think personal poet-consultant. Call upon Adam to provide perspective on that difficult life transition or for everyday humor. Only time limits the quantity of muses. So, give him a shout.

(P.S. I purchased my first poem at Overton Square’s Crawfish Festival. My inspiration? Getting lost in crowds. Here’s (part of) poem #981.)

Learned Advice from Living Social Media

Well folks, the show’s over: I came, I blogged, I conquered. What most of you don’t know is that I started this blog as an extension of a grad-school course: Social Media Theory and Practice by the indispensable, innovative, and often imitated Dr. Carrie Brown-Smith.

She’s classy to share her trade secrets with novices and burgeoning professionals. And in four months, her apprentices have Googled, WordPressed, crowdsourced, conversed, curated, chatted, Cinemagram’d, Wiki’d, tweeted, tumblr’d, photographed, video’d, viral’d, YouTubed, 365’d, optimized, LinkedIn, Facebooked, FourSquared, Yelped, Pinterest’d, recon’d, resourced, TechCrunched, Jarvis’d, Rosen’d, Shirky’d, Storifed, metricked, mapped, and engaged audiences. All for our own brands.

I emphatically understand that “life is about small events,” as Brad King penned. Every interaction (IRL and online) is an opportunity. And I’ve taken advantage of many:

  • My Storifies and hashtag participation have linked me to renowned academic journalists across the country.
  • Generous link-sharing resulted in guest posting on one of my favorite sites.
  • I’ve interviewed and subsequently quoted 60 people. Many new to me and now future contacts.
  • Actively following a new Facebook group led to being cast as a movie extra…now proudly touting an IMDB.
  • Mapping data netted me free drinks on a sunshine-laden patio.

If President Obama appointed this professor to a post, she’d be THE nation’s Social Media Czar. Thank you, Carrie, for imparting your wisdom, helping me find my voice, and uncovering a new passion.

My five-minute thesis, “Journalism Disrupted: Entrepreneurs & the Nouveau Niche,” with inclusions from Dr. Brown’s #SOCIALJ and Dr. Kelley’s #JPRENEUR classes. Presented on April 8, 2014 at Christian Brothers University for Ignite CBU. 

“Let Me Take a Selfie” and Change the World

Selfies are en vogue. People pose for them during their morning commute, while traveling alone, and especially when clubbin’ (thus inspiring this spring’s hit song).

I’ve personally jumped on the bandwagon by recently capturing my brother and his new wife’s first moment as a married couple. The second after they were deemed official, it was selfie time.

Ellen DeGeneres‘ star-laden candid was the most retweeted tweet ever. While that selfie’s record is Oscar-worthy, its generous impact meant more. Yes, a tweet that was circulated more than 34 million times resulted in millions donated to charity including $1.5MM to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. (Disclosure: St. Jude is my employer.)

Yet this week, it was time to one-up Ellen.

One of my favorite parts of the job is giving people tours of St. Jude, especially first-timers. On Monday, we hosted professionals, streamers, and influencers from the highest echelons of the virtual gaming world to help launch a streaming-fundraising platform for St. Jude: Play Live.

Because my group was so enthusiastic and light-hearted, I sporadically wanted to remember our fun time together. While I asked others to post the pic, they said, “Go for it,” and they’d join the effort. And did they ever?!

113 favorites and 26 retweets resulted because of their audiences. Small potatoes to Ellen, St. Jude, and them personally, but astonishing for a commoner like me.

However, my point isn’t to selfishly talk about a silly selfie. It’s the heart and generosity of others. These celebs, social media juggernauts, and gaming royals chose to help St. Jude and spread the cause to their followers. (My group alone had a collective 450,000.)

It wasn’t blasé self-promotion. It wasn’t calculated. It was their spur-of-the-moment, genuine desire to help others.

And that’s pretty rad if you ask me.

*We tried to take a proper, arm-showing selfie but a Baby Boomer interrupted us and just grabbed my phone. Pictured are Johnathan, Max, Aureylian, Panser, Ducksauce, Ms Vixen, MC, Renée, Noah, and Sarah.

P.S. Watch for super-cool stuff from #PlayLive and Twitch streamers next month.

Content, Curation, and Criticism

“The greatest reward for consistently sharing interesting content…is the request for new connections, friends, fans, and followers,” said Brian Solis. As he further outlined in this article, Solis writes that information is currency, and curation done well is an art.

What’s nifty about content curation is that “links are presents that can be given or earned but not bought,” according to Jeff Jarvis. Who doesn’t like sharing free finds?

That’s modern day curation, which includes pretty much everyone that shares deals, ideas, jokes, and news. But if you can figure out a way to cash in by spreading cool content, you’ve reached baller status.

To do this expertly, it’s better if you have a trained eye within your topic. If you’re a fashionista like Elle Perry, I therefore trust the trendy wardrobe recommendations. If you’re “Piled higher. (and) Deeper,” you probably know more about your subject area than me. Mindy McAdams‘ seven curation tips point out that if you’re an authority on a matter, readers trust you more.

Every post in my beat is derived from personal experiences. Whether I went to an event, visited a restaurant, or interviewed someone, I’m relaying first-hand insights or information to others.

Some use curation to dive into the experiences and emotions of others. “For me, I wanted to tell the story of Tunisia at an extraordinary moment in time, and capture as much personal media as possible from people living through it,” said Andy Carvin in an interview with Ethan Zuckerman. Carvin covered several country fallouts from the ground up via Twitter.

Yet, curating, like other forms of journalism, can come at a cost. If one develops a heavy habit of aggregating articles or finds, meaningful content could get sacrificed. And reputations could become diluted. (BuzzFeed comes to mind.)

And then there are the critics. A couple of months ago, I photographed some popular drinking establishments around town. The “Juke Joint” post garnered more than 1,500 uniques. Maybe because it was bars. Maybe because it sounded subversive.

As I had feared, not everyone agreed with my choices. Worse. Some vehemently told me so. This or that selection was “more than a stretch” to be placed on that list.

All picks were homegrown, independent venues that feature local music. And I prefaced the post explaining my broader definition of a juke joint (not the Delta-specific, turn-of-the-century one). Why? Because it’s 2014.

And we live in a metropolis.

Even going down South to Clarksdale’s Ground Zero wouldn’t replicate Harpo’s hidden joint.

Was I perturbed by the discourse? No. But my immediate reaction was along the same vein of Jeff Jarvis’ sentiments…”Those damn hipsters,” I thought. Scout them out some grungy spots where the closing time isn’t posted, and it’s still not edgy enough.

My intent was to start a conversation about freshening up the “juke joint” label because these too were institutions of local culture. Yes, traditional word choice meanings are important, but sometimes it’s the popular sites that’ll be remembered as historic.

Then I realized, it’s all a matter of perspective and maybe everyone doesn’t have the gift to bring soul wherever they go.

My juke joint is a place where I can mingle, drink, and jive. And it just so happens that I’ve curated one hell of a long list.